Alpha Dental’s Hygiene Program

We at Alpha Dental believe that optimal oral hygiene is of the utmost importance. Healthy gums not only are a part of a healthy mouth, but are linked to a healthy body.  System health is influenced by periodontal disease. Studies have shown that periodontal disease is linked to: transient bacteremia (elevated bacteria in the blood stream that is transferred from the mouth), an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, increased risk of pancreatic and kidney cancer by 62%, and women who have periodontal disease are shown to have preterm low weight babies. Those with heart disease are three times more likely to die of heart disease and stroke. Research has found that there is an association between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Diabetes and gum disease unfortunately have a synergistic affect on each other. People with gum disease are more at risk for diabetes and people that have diabetes have a harder time controlling gum disease. Diabetes and bleeding gums can increase your risk of premature death. Treating gum disease is expensive, painful and challenging. Preventing gum disease is just the opposite! Healthy gums are easier to maintain and with regular consistent care can be kept at health.  In essence, we promote healthy mouths to promote healthy people!

Optimal Oral Hygiene Homecare:

Brushing and flossing or using a water pik twice daily is crucial for healthy teeth and the gums and bone supporting them.

Brushing:

Hold the bristles of the tooth brush at 45 degree angle where the gums and teeth meet. Gently make small circles slowly moving along the gums across the mouth, continue along the tongue side brushing all the teeth and the biting surface. This should take approximately 2 minutes to brush all the teeth on all sides of the teeth.

Alternative- Electric tooth brushes are great tools in place of regular manual tooth brush. Holding the tooth brush bristles at the same 45 degree angle and moving the brush head across the gums/teeth however, no need for the circular motion, the brush does all the scrubbing for you. Continue for 2 minutes until all the teeth have been brushed from the cheek side, tongue side and biting surface. 

Floss:

Cut about 12 inches of floss. Wrap the floss around each of your middle fingers, and use your thumb and index finger to manipulate the floss.  Begin at the upper right corner of your mouth (this is in order to systematically go through and not miss an area) place the floss at the back of the last tooth in your mouth.  Slide the floss down the tooth and go slightly under the gums. Scrape the floss back up the side of the tooth by making a “c” shape with the floss and hugging the tooth. Continue by rolling the floss to a different section. Proceed to the next two teeth and slide down one of the teeth to the gum. Pick the floss up and hug the adjacent tooth and scrape down the side of the tooth to the gum. Scrape up the side of the tooth to pull the floss out and repeat the procedure.

 

The key to keeping a bright, healthy smile throughout adulthood is to practice proper oral hygiene. Anyone can get cavities, as well as gum disease that can lead to serious problems. Throughout your adult life, it’s important to continue to:

Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove dental plaque – the sticky film on your teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay and inflammation of the gums, called gingivitis. Fluoride paste is important in that it acts as a “tooth vitamin” to help strengthen the tooth and prevent decay. It doubles in helping with sensitivity.

Floss daily or use a water pik to remove plaque from between your teeth and under your gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a dental hygienist during a professional cleaning.

Limit sugary or starchy foods, especially sticky snacks. The more often you snack between meals, the more chances you give bacteria to create the acids that attack your tooth enamel.

Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups.

Click on the following link to see a YouTube video on proper use of a dental waterpik